Artist Bio

Rhiane Aurielle’s work derives from the idea/truth of a ‘(Western) phallocentric economy’, techno-science into science fiction and cyberfeminism into xenofeminism. The body is probed under the realm of binary thought and positioned within the material realm where binaries can be transcended. Aurielle considers the re-theorisation of the Möbius strip in relation to bodies, interiors and exteriors becoming one entity, winding and coiling until their surfaces are non-orientable and the inside flips, the outside turns in. Aurielle examines the potentiality of cyborg bodies, hybridity’s and amalgamations of the organic and inorganic, nature and the artificial. Her concern with the inbetweenness of bodies, bodies that are machine-human hybrids and bodies that defy prescribed gender categories manifests through the material change and mutation that is incessantly probed.

 

Through her sculptural pieces, Aurielle probes the potential life sequences and iterations of materials and their impending capacity to be manipulated and transformed. Many of the materials she uses are symptomatic of disposability, decay and toxicity, oscillating between consumable and inconsumable substances. The notion of material and matter existing within multiple states of in-between-ness is fundamental to Aurielle’s process of making; material is unfixed and transient, continuously decaying or morphing beyond itself. Aurielle believes this is particularly true of her gelatine sculptures, they are in a sentient process of mutation where bacteria can breed through controlled preservation.

 

Aurielle habitually considers siblings within her works, repetitions birthed from an initial cradle that mutate beyond themselves, their self-transformation ruminates through each sculpture – slightly altered, slightly modified from the previous. These siblings exist through an iterative process; they are rebirthed, recycled and updated, continuously grazing against the boundaries of human, animal and machine.  At times Aurielle’s sculptures are amorphous, undefined bodily excesses and micro-excesses. In other situations, they can be lumpen fractures quarried from a former amassment, mutated iterations, alien excretions and forms materialised from human, animal and machine-like bodies. 

© RHIANE AURIELLE. 2018